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February 13, 2008
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HP
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HP psc1400
Date Taken
Jul 3, 2006, 3:11:57 PM
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Nambu Type 99 Machine Gun by stopsigndrawer81 Nambu Type 99 Machine Gun by stopsigndrawer81
The Nambu Type 99 machine gun was probably the finest Japanese small arm in use that the Imperial Army would have had during WWII. However, it was adapted only in 1939, not issued en masse until 1942, and did not see combat until 1943, a fate very similar to Germany's MP/StG-44 assault rifle: too little- too late. The Nambu Type 99 was chambered in the 7.7x58mm rimless rifle round, the same as that used in the Type 99 bolt-action rifle, basically a rimless version of the .303 British for those of you familiar with rifle cartridges. The Nambu Type 99, like the earlier Type 96 had several unusual features for a light machine gun, including the ability to mount the arisaka rifle bayonet and a special 1x scope. The Type 99 featured a higher cyclic rate of fire at 850 rounds per minute, The Type 99 borrowed much internal design from the Czech ZB-26, doing away with the unreliable cartridge lublicating system. In the end, the Type 99 did not save Japan from final doom in 1945 and the guns were scattered all over southeast asia, seeing use in the Chinese civil war, Korean War and in Vietnam in limited quantities.
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:iconautodeceptitron:
AUTODECEPTITRON Featured By Owner Jan 31, 2015
Taipu 99 Keikikanjū (Type 99 light machine gun)
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I'll admit I don't know how to say it in japanese
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:iconautodeceptitron:
AUTODECEPTITRON Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2015
This along with the Type 96 were the only few successful weapons that the Japanese ever made. Much like the British Bren light machine gun, the Type 99 and 96 use a 30 round top loaded box magazine and have interchangeable barrels in case one overheats. The only disadvantage I can think of about this gun was that like the Bren gun, it was bulky and awkward, especially during the reload.
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Have you fired a Bren (or a Nambu LMG) before?  I have never had the opportunity (yet!) but I am told the top mounted magazine arrangement did away with certain problems when firing from the prone position, which is how a light machine gun was really designed to be used any ways.  Interchangable barrels were a pretty common feature on machine guns back then and still are today.
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:iconautodeceptitron:
AUTODECEPTITRON Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2015
Well, actually, come to think of it, a top loading weapon IS easier to reload. However, you have to be careful with the prone position because the brass is bottom ejecting. Other than that, the Type 96 and 99 LMG's were pretty good guns. Sadly, the Japanese were unable to produce enough of them.
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:iconcomannderrx:
ComannderrX Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2014
didnt thse people make the nambu handgun?
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Yep, same people, same guy Nambu.
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:iconcomannderrx:
ComannderrX Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2014
what else did they make?
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
The Nambu Pistols in various makes and models from 1902- WWII, the cruddy Type 94 Pistol (in the same 8mm Nambu Caliber), the Arisaka Type 38 and Type 99 Bolt Action Rifles and Carbines, The 8mm Type 100 and 100/44 submachine guns (visually resembled the Bergmann MP28II), and the Nambu Light Machine Gun series of the Type 11, 96, and 99, and the Heavy Machine Guns (resembling the WWI French Hotchkiss more or less).  Not all of this was Co. Nambu's work but Japanese small arms, while crappy in comparison to anything used by the West at that time, are a whole field of study in and of themselves.
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:iconcomannderrx:
ComannderrX Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2014
ii see
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:iconthedeathmachine:
TheDeathMachine Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I got 99 kills,but a headshot ain't 1!Hai!
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:icontomradem:
TomradeM Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
I heard that the IJA actually had three types of 7.7 ammo Rimmed for aircraft machine-guns, semi rimmed for Light machine-guns and rimless for rifles. all non interchangeable.. in other words a quartermaster's worst nightmare
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Pretty Much. I think the Nambu Type 99 Light Machine Gun and the Arisaka Type 99 Rifle used the same ammo though. If you look at My Nambu Type 11 Light machine gun, you'll see the problems with the 6.5mm Arisaka ammo interchangeability between it and the Arisaka Type 38 Rifle.
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:iconbrandonm1999:
brandonM1999 Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2013
this is the old version of the bern LMG
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Nope. The Bren was introduced in 1937. This gun was formally introduced in 1939, and not issued in quantity until 1943. It has some cosmetic similarities such as a top mounted curved box magazine but the two are totally different guns.
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:iconcrimsonthunder1995:
crimsonthunder1995 Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011
a bren... fine work...
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Only a Bren in relation to the flash hider and curved top loading magazine, some features taken from the ZB-26s used by nationalist China ( forerunner of the bren) but the Nambu Type 99 is its own design.
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:iconcrimsonthunder1995:
crimsonthunder1995 Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2011
ok =)
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:iconsir-smells-alot:
sir-smells-alot Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2011
Dont mean to burst your bubble, but I think I have seen one of these at the shooting range in Oklahoma City
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
A few of these were brought back as war trophies by returning GIs from the pacific front. A majority of US states, including Oklahoma allow for civilian machine gun ownership if it complies with all federal regulation on full autos. 7.7mm Jap ammo would be expensive and scarce, but to see a Nambu Type 99 brought back to life on a US shooting range would not be unheard of.
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:iconsir-smells-alot:
sir-smells-alot Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2011
Come to think of it there is one on autoweapons.com right now
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for telling me. Ive been to that site before many times but not in a while.
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:iconspydigger:
spydigger Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
i believe it was also used as a AAgun
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Not that I know of. That would have been the 7.7mm Type 92 with an AA tripod.
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:iconspydigger:
spydigger Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
oh i see
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:iconmodanpon:
Modanpon Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010
Besides looking at the stock, an easy way to differentiate between the Type 99 LMG and a BREN (or even Czech zb. 26) is to look at the barrel handle. If it points towards the stock, it's a BREN or zb. 26. If it points the opposite direction, it's a Nambu.
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
I ussually can "just tell." Esspecially by the shape of the trigger and trigger guard.
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:iconmodanpon:
Modanpon Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010
There's that as well. You could even look for a bayonet lug, which the Nambu has.
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
I think the Nambu Light machine guns were unique in having bayonet mounts.
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:iconmodanpon:
Modanpon Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010
Yeah. It does seem unusual to put a bayonet on such a heavy (compared to a Type 99 RIFLE) gun though.

Then again, the Japs DID put aircraft sights on their Type 38s...
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Actually the anti-aircraft sights were on some of the 7.7mm Type 99 rifles, not the earlier 6.5mm Type 38 rifles. Later Type 99 rifles deleted this feature.
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:iconmodanpon:
Modanpon Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010
Both had that monopod at least.

I wonder if any aircraft were shot down with T99 (1939) rifles...
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
I highly doubt that any allied aircraft were shot down with Type 99 rifles using the aircraft sights, though Afghan Mujahaden during the 1980s were able to shoot down soviet helecopters with a single-shot from bolt-action rifles under limited circustances.
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(1 Reply)
:iconp3rsh1ng:
p3rsh1ng Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2009
Kinda makes me wonder how could u aim properly with the magazine on the upper side...
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
The magazine, like on the cosmetically similar British Bren and Czech ZB-26 would have been slightly offset to one side, while the front and rear sights were put slightly on the left. The top mounted magazine allowed for a larger capacity magazine that was easier to manipulate from the prone position, without the magazine "monopodding" off the ground.
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
Wow! I had heard of such a Thompson conversion but thought it was just a prototype. Never heard of them doing that to the sten though. It'd be nice if I could ever see some pictures of such converted guns.
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:iconpureevel:
PUREevel Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2009
I think I may actually have some around here, some where, maybe. If I can find them I will post them if I can get my scanner to work.
Plus, while it may have been easier to produce the ammunition in the short term, factor in trying to send it to the soildiers, the right kind, right amount etc. It was just easier to modify the weapons and use less types of ammunition than to produce and try to ship many different types of ammunition to the soldiers. A lesson the Italians of World War II never learned in time.
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:iconxujunhua:
xujunhua Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2009
fine gun.more powerful than type96.it use 7.7*58SRmm rounds.my grandpa said that it was accurate and they(Chinese warriors)like it as well as ZB26.because the bullets it use were hard to get,during 1970s,nearly all type99 in China had been changed to use 7.62*39mmM43 rounds.now we can only see it in the war films in China.
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
I had heard that too- Nambu Type 99s rechambered to fire 7.62x39mm ammunition from AK-47/AKM type magazines. However, wouldn't have been easier for them to simply manufacture a quantity of the old 7.7x58mm to use in these old guns?
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:iconxujunhua:
xujunhua Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2009
the reality is during 1950s almost all ZB26s, Nambu Type 99s ,Nambu Type 96s and other kinds light machine guns in China had been rechambered to fire 7.62x39mm ammunition from AK-47/AKM type magazines. even the submachine gun like Sten and Tomason had been rechambered to fire 7.62x25mm ammunition from TT33/PPSH41/PPs type magazines. it is a real huge project.
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:iconmr-medik:
Mr-Medik Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2009
It's also known as the type 96 too, I don't know which is correct.
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
The Type 96 was the type 99's predecessor, chambered for a different round than the type 99, and unlike the type 99, the type 96 required lubricated cartridges. The type 96 had a slower cyclic rate of fire, and was not normally equipped with the flash hider usually seen on the type 99.
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks! The Type 99 did away with the Type 96's need to lubricate the cartridges, resulting in a much more reliable gun, eventhough cosmetically they appeared largely identical. A conical flash hider was developed for the Type 99 as well, though this may have gone missing from many specimens today.
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:iconshelbs2:
shelbs2 Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2008
nice job.

wasnt the only difference between the Type 96 and the Type 99 caliber? The Type 96 fired the 6.5mm round while the Type 99 fired the 7.7mm. I cant remember if there were more differences than that
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:iconstopsigndrawer81:
stopsigndrawer81 Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks! One word of caution though, if your uncle's machine gun wasn't registered with the BATF prior to May 19th, 1986, the gun is unfortunately consitered contraband by the Feds. If that's the case, he'll need to keep it hidden somewhere.
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:icondrewthefan123:
drewthefan123 Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2008
my great uncle smuggled one home when he fought the Japs in WW2

Yes,it is a fine gun!
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:iconwill-the-jackalope:
Will-The-Jackalope Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2009
WHAT HAPPENED TO IT?!
D:
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:icondrewthefan123:
drewthefan123 Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2009
It got lost to time, and got thrown to the sea when the Librals took over Cali. Years ago... :/ I hate tobring it up...
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:iconwill-the-jackalope:
Will-The-Jackalope Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2009
Anti-gun fascist pigs.
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:icondrewthefan123:
drewthefan123 Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2009
Amen! I would love to watch them burn in hell for that sin! >:(
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